Am I Normal?

On July 20, 2017, in Uncategorized, by drneilcannon1

If you are like most people, you have probably wondered how you compare sexually to others.  Here is a summary from a large newly published study led by Dr. Debby Herbenick from the Indian University and her team of researchers.

The survey was confidential and the researchers never had access to respondents’ identifiers. Respondents reported on demographic items, lifetime and recent sexual behaviors, and the appeal of 50+ sexual behaviors. Most (>80%) reported lifetime masturbation, vaginal sex, and oral sex. Lifetime anal sex was reported by 43% of men (insertive) and 37% of women (receptive). Common lifetime sexual behaviors included wearing sexy lingerie/underwear (75% women, 26% men), sending/receiving digital nude/ semi-nude photos (54% women, 65% men), reading erotic stories (57% of participants), public sex (43%), role-playing (22%), tying/being tied up (20%), spanking (30%), and watching sexually explicit videos/DVDs (60% women, 82% men). Having engaged in threesomes (10% women, 18% men) and playful whipping (13%) were less common. Lifetime group sex, sex parties, taking a sexuality class/workshop, and going to BDSM parties were uncommon (each <8%).

Thank you, Debby for such an important contribution to our field!

© 2017 Herbenick et al

Advancing the Field of Human Sexuality

On November 28, 2015, in Uncategorized, by drneilcannon1

There were many of us who worked for over one year to create the following statement that was recently approved by the Board of Directors of the American Association of Sexuality Educators, Counselors & Therapists (AASECT).  When the statement was approved, Dr. Russell Stambaugh said, “With this passage of this position, AASECT is officially on record as supporting BDSM, polyamory and consensual non-monogamy as potentially sexually healthy lifestyle choices and behaviors.  This constitutes full implementation of Kinsey’s ideas about the broad range of sexually healthy behaviors.”

© Markus Gann | Dreamstime.com

© Markus Gann | Dreamstime.com

Sexual Expression including Orientation and Identity: Treatment & Education Foundations

 

It is the position of the American Association of Sexuality Educators, Counselors, and Therapists that we oppose any and all therapy models and interventions as well as any educational programs and curricula that seek to pathologize, dictate, or prescribe a person’s sexual orientation, identity, and/or consensual, sexual expression, whether or not it is conventional or atypical.  Regardless of how such clinical interventions or educational programs are labeled or named, AASECT recommends all helping and educating professionals to utilize best practices and culturally relevant resources for foundation and reference.

Furthermore:  AASECT affirms that sexuality is central to the human experience and sexual rights must be honored in order for sexual health and overall well-being to be obtained.  Informed by the best empirical research, AASECT recognizes human sexual experiences as diverse and supports the acceptance of sexual diversity while embracing consensual sexual expression within the framework of human rights and social justice.

AASECT accepts the evidence that human sexual experience includes a vast spectrum of sexual expression, orientation, and identities. These sexualities, between consenting adults when agreed upon, with permission, and assenting, are typically not psychopathological behaviors. Indeed, recent peer-reviewed research on these sexual experiences shows no correlation to pathology.

AASECT further asserts that all people seeking treatment and education about consensual sexual behavior, identity, or orientation deserve accurate information.  AASECT accepts that the empirical evidence is reasonably complete on reparative and conversion therapies that attempt to change sexual orientation or identity and shows that these techniques are experimental at best and overwhelmingly ineffective, with harmful consequences for clients widely documented.

AASECT takes the position that social justice plays an essential and foundational role in the organization’s mission.  Individuals have the right to be free as possible from undue constraints (e.g. discrimination, stigmatization, oppression and violence) along with the freedom to consensual sexual expression. Destigmatizing human sexual expression and experiences as well as creating and maintaining safe space for those who have been traditionally marginalized are essential practices for AASECT members who are predominately mental health practitioners and educators.  This overarching goal compels AASECT to disavow any therapeutic and educational effort that, even if unwittingly, violates or impinges on AASECT’s vision of human rights and social justice.

patti

She may not be Bill Clinton, but she is definitely one of the most important people in the field of sexuality.  Dr. Patti Britton is the Immediate Past President of the American Association of Sexuality Educators, Counselors and Therapists (AASECT).  www.aasect.org. Past President’s of AASECT read like the “Who’s Who” of sexuality professionals.  AASECT is the leading organization that certifies sex therapists throughout the world.  As I was thinking about the honor of having Dr. Britton appear on our show, I couldn’t help but think back to the elation I felt the day I learned that my 75 page application to become an AASECT Certified Sex Therapist was approved by the certification committee.  In addition to adherence to a strict code of ethics, AASECT Certified Sex Therapists are required to meet a long list of educational, experiential and clinical requirements.  Few people are better equipped to discuss any sexual concern than Certified Sex Therapist, Dr. Patti Britton.  I hope you will join us for what promises to be an excellent show.  For more about the show: www.sexandintimacyshow.com.   To learn more about Dr. Patti Britton: http://www.yoursexcoach.com/

Preachers, Physicians & Sex Therapy…

On January 9, 2009, in Uncategorized, by drneilcannon1

 

Many people seek sexual counseling from their pastor, rabbi or priest on topics ranging from pre-marital counseling to sexual abuse, to teenage sexuality, to couples counseling and sexual orientation issues.  That would be like coming to me to have your car fixed – I could listen and I know where the engine is but that’s about it.  According to a study released today by the Religious Institute on Sexual Morality, Justice and Healing; sexuality education is virtually non-existent for seminary students.  According to the highly respected Rev. Debra Haffner, “There is an urgent need for ordained clergy who understand the connections between religion and sexuality.”  If you need support related to sexuality, the best solution is to find a certified sex therapist which you can do by checking with the American Association of Sexuality Educators, Counselors and Therapists www.aasect.org.  There are more than 2000 members of AASECT throughout the world, the requirements for certification are comprehensive, and we are all here to help.  www.doctorcannon.com